Scripture Roundtable 32: D&C Gospel Doctrine Lesson 28, “O God, Where Art Thou?”

This is Scripture Roundtable 32 from The Interpreter Foundation, in which we discuss Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine Lesson #28, “O God, Where Art Thou?,” focusing on D&C 121, 122, and 123, bringing in various insights to help us better understand the scriptures. These roundtables will generally follow the 2013 Gospel Doctrine schedule of scriptures, a few weeks ahead of time.

Some of the interesting discussion in this roundtable includes:

  • Historical setting for D&C 121, 122, 123: Joseph Smith in Liberty Jail and the tensions surrounding the “Mormon War” of 1838
  • Discussion of the LDS Theodicy as presented in those sections
  • This life is for us to gain experience, even and especially when that is hard, in order to make us more empathetic and Godlike.

Here is the link to “Sin, Suffering, and Soul-Making: Joseph Smith on the Problem of Evil,” by Blake T. Ostler and David L. Paulsen, as mentioned in the roundtable.

Panelists for this roundtable include Andrew Smith, Cassandra Hedelius, Lincoln Hale, and Stephen Smoot.

This roundtable is also available as an audio podcast, and will be included in the podcast feed. You can listen by pressing the play button or download the podcast below:

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3 thoughts on “Scripture Roundtable 32: D&C Gospel Doctrine Lesson 28, “O God, Where Art Thou?”

  1. Great discussion again…great addition to my own lesson preparation. Thanks much for your thoughts and study and willingness to share…grateful too for the spirit of testimony and humility from such well-studied contributors. Keep it up!

  2. Thanks for including a lady into your discussion this week! I always learn so much in preparation for my lessons. This was another great roundtable discussion. I appreciate the link to ” ”Sin, Suffering, and Soul-Making: Joseph Smith on the Problem of Evil,” by Blake T. Ostler and David L. Paulsen.

    I would have loved a link also to Elder Neal A. Maxwell’s great quotes.

    • Ah, I found the quote I was for which I was searching! Here it is for anyone else who would like to use it in class:

      Neal A. Maxwell

      In some ways, our second estate, in relationship to our first estate, is like agreeing in advance to surgery. Then the anesthetic of forgetfulness settles in upon us. Just as doctors do not de-anesthetize a patient in the midst of authorized surgery to ask him again if the surgery should be continued, so, after divine tutoring, we agreed to come here and to submit ourselves to certain experiences; it was an irrevocable decision. (“A More Determined Discipleship,” Neal A. MaxwellEnsign, Feb. 1979, p. 70)

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