Scripture Roundtable 55: Old Testament Gospel Doctrine Lesson 5, “If Thou Doest Well, Thou Shalt Be Accepted”

This is Scripture Roundtable 55 from The Interpreter Foundation, in which we discuss the Old Testament Gospel Doctrine Lesson #5, “If Thou Doest Well, Thou Shalt Be Accepted,” focusing on scriptures in Moses 5-7, bringing in various insights to help us better understand the scriptures. These roundtables will generally follow the 2014 Gospel Doctrine schedule of scriptures, a few weeks ahead of time.

Panelists for this roundtable include Jeffrey BradshawMartin Tanner, and Bruce Webster.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjDP5ULv4Nw

This roundtable is also available as an audio podcast, and will be included in the podcast feed. You can listen by pressing the play button or download the podcast below:

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4 thoughts on “Scripture Roundtable 55: Old Testament Gospel Doctrine Lesson 5, “If Thou Doest Well, Thou Shalt Be Accepted”

  1. Perhaps the concept that the Atonement saves all except the most stubborn comes from the September 2013 Ensign article by Brad Wilcox, based on his talk ” My Grace is Sufficient” in a BYU devotional from July 2011:
    ‘I know a young man who just got out of prison—again. Each time two roads diverge in a yellow wood, he takes the wrong one—every time. When he was a teenager dealing with every bad habit a teenage boy can have, I said to his father, “We need to get him to EFY.” I have worked with that program since 1985. I know the good it can do.

    His dad said, “I can’t afford that.”

    I said, “I can’t afford it either, but you put some in, and I’ll put some in, and then we’ll go to my mom, because she is a real softy.”

    We finally got the kid to EFY, but how long do you think he lasted? Not even a day. By the end of the first day he called his mother and said, “Get me out of here!” Heaven will not be heaven for those who have not chosen to be heavenly.

    In the past I had a picture in my mind of what the final judgment would be like, and it went something like this: Jesus standing there with a clipboard and Brad standing on the other side of the room nervously looking at Jesus.

    Jesus checks His clipboard and says, “Oh, shoot, Brad. You missed it by two points.”

    Brad begs Jesus, “Please, check the essay question one more time! There have to be two points you can squeeze out of that essay.” That’s how I always saw it.

    But the older I get, and the more I understand this wonderful plan of redemption, the more I realize that in the final judgment it will not be the unrepentant sinner begging Jesus, “Let me stay.” No, he will probably be saying, “Get me out of here!” Knowing Christ’s character, I believe that if anyone is going to be begging on that occasion, it would probably be Jesus begging the unrepentant sinner, “Please, choose to stay. Please, use my Atonement—not just to be cleansed but to be changed so that you want to stay.”

    The miracle of the Atonement is not just that we can go home but that—miraculously—we can feel at home there. If Christ did not require faith and repentance, then there would be no desire to change. Think of your friends and family members who have chosen to live without faith and without repentance. They don’t want to change. They are not trying to abandon sin and become comfortable with God. Rather, they are trying to abandon God and become comfortable with sin. If Jesus did not require covenants and bestow the gift of the Holy Ghost, then there would be no way to change. We would be left forever with only willpower, with no access to His power. If Jesus did not require endurance to the end, then there would be no internalization of those changes over time. They would forever be surface and cosmetic rather than sinking inside us and becoming part of us—part of who we are. Put simply, if Jesus didn’t require practice, then we would never become pianists.’

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