Scripture Roundtable 40: D&C Gospel Doctrine Lesson 36, “The Desert Shall Rejoice, and Blossom as the Rose”

(Originally published on 17 August 2013.)

This is Scripture Roundtable 40 from The Interpreter Foundation, in which we discuss Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine Lesson #36, “The Desert Shall Rejoice, and Blossom as the Rose,” bringing in various insights to help us better understand the scriptures and our history. These roundtables will generally follow the 2013 Gospel Doctrine schedule of scriptures, a few weeks ahead of time.

Panelists for this roundtable include Andrew Smith, Cassandra Hedelius, Craig Foster, and Lincoln Hale.

Some highlights from this roundtable include:

  • What was the Salt Lake valley like when the pioneers got there?
  • Discussion of the difficulty for these saints, their perseverance, faith and obedience, and how those can be examples and instructive for us today.
  • Stewardship in the Lord’s kingdom and what that means for all of us, whether we are called to colonize, go on missions, etc.

Resources noted in the roundtable:

This roundtable is also available as an audio podcast, and will be included in the podcast feed. You can listen by pressing the play button or download the podcast below:

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Scripture Roundtable 38: D&C Gospel Doctrine Lesson 34, Faith in Every Footstep

(Originally published on 3 August 2013.)

This is Scripture Roundtable 38 from The Interpreter Foundation, in which we discuss Doctrine & Covenants Gospel Doctrine Lesson #34, “Faith in Every Footstep,” focusing on D&C 136, bringing in various insights to help us better understand the scriptures. These roundtables will generally follow the 2013 Gospel Doctrine schedule of scriptures, a few weeks ahead of time.

Panelists for this roundtable include Martin Tanner and Shon Hopkin.

Some highlights from this roundtable include:

  • Lead yourself out of bondage to a better place in your life.
  • We can learn from the examples of the pioneers.
  • Our journey through life is similar to the journey of the pioneers. They crossed the plains at profound personal sacrifice and often under severe hardship. Demonstrating great faith, courage, and endurance, they set an example for us to follow.

This roundtable is also available as an audio podcast, and will be included in the podcast feed. You can listen by pressing the play button or download the podcast below:

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Scripture Roundtable 59: Old Testament Gospel Doctrine Lesson 9, “God Will Provide Himself a Lamb”

This is Scripture Roundtable 59 from The Interpreter Foundation, in which we discuss the Old Testament Gospel Doctrine Lesson #9, “God Will Provide Himself a Lamb,” focusing on scriptures in Abraham 1, Genesis 15-17, 21-22, and others, bringing in various insights to help us better understand the scriptures. These roundtables will generally follow the 2014 Gospel Doctrine schedule of scriptures, a few weeks ahead of time.

Panelists for this roundtable include Mike Parker, Jeffrey Bradshaw, Benjamin McGuire, and Daniel Peterson.

A few sources cited in this roundtable:

  •  “The sacrifice required of Abraham in the offering up of Isaac, shows that if a man would attain to the keys of the kingdom of an endless life; he must sacrifice all things.”—Joseph Smith, 27 August 1843, recorded by Willard Richards. History of the Church 5:555; Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith 322. Richards’ record is a little unclear, and has been emended by later scribes; the original reads “by the offering of Isaac.—if a man would attain—he must sacrifice all to attain to the keys of the kingdom of an endless life.” Words of Joseph Smith 244.
  • “[Jesus] and the Apostles, in various places, clearly set forth that Abraham was the great exemplar of faith for them to follow, and that [we] must follow him, if [we] ever [expect] to participate in the glory and exaltation enjoyed by Abraham and his faithful seed.

    ….
    “God required Abraham to sacrifice that which was most dear to him, and he will also require at our hands that which is most dear to us.”
    —George Q. Cannon, 6 October 1873. Journal of Discourses 16:245.

This roundtable is also available as an audio podcast, and will be included in the podcast feed. You can listen by pressing the play button or download the podcast below:

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“In the Mount of the Lord It Shall Be Seen” and “Provided”: Theophany and Sacrifice as the Etiological Foundation of the Temple in Israelite and Latter-day Saint Tradition

Abstract: For ancient Israelites, the temple was a place where sacrifice and theophany (i.e., seeing God or other heavenly beings) converged. The account of Abraham’s “arrested” sacrifice of Isaac (Genesis 22) and the account of the arrested slaughter of Jerusalem following David’s unauthorized census of Israel (2 Samuel 24; 1 Chronicles 21) served as etiological narratives—explanations of “cause” or “origin”—for the location of the Jerusalem temple and its sacrifices. Wordplay on the verb rāʾâ (to “see”) in these narratives creates an etiological link between the place-names “Jehovah-jireh,” “Moriah” and the threshing floor of Araunah/Ornan, pointing to the future location of the Jerusalem temple as the place of theophany and sacrifice par excellence. Isaac’s arrested sacrifice and the vicarious animal sacrifices of the temple anticipated Jesus’s later “un-arrested” sacrifice since, as Jesus himself stated, “Abraham rejoiced to see my day” (John 8:56). Sacrifice itself was a kind of theophany in which one’s own redemption could be “seen” and the scriptures of the Restoration confirm that Abraham and many others, even “a great many thousand years before” the coming of Christ, “saw” Jesus’s sacrifice and “rejoiced.” Additionally, theophany and sacrifice converge in the canonized revelations regarding the building of the [Page 202]latter-day temple. These temple revelations begin with a promise of theophany, and mandate sacrifice from the Latter-day Saints. In essence, the temple itself was, and is, Christ’s atonement having its intended effect on humanity. Continue reading

New Book Notice

Two new books of interest have just been published by Eisenbrauns.

1. Anne Porter and Glenn M. Schwartz, Sacred Killing: The Archaeology of Sacrifice in the Ancient Near East.  Eisenbrauns, 2012. $59.50.  ISBN: 9781575062365

https://www.eisenbrauns.com/ECOM/_3M10YAVPP.HTM

This book examines the archaeology and anthropology of ancient Near Eastern sacrifice, helping us understand the nature of ancient sacrifice as reflected in the Bible.

 

2. William Mierse, Temples and Sanctuaries from the Early Iron Age Levant: Recovery After Collapse. Eisenbrauns, Forthcoming, October, 2012.  $59.50.  ISBN: 9781575062464

https://www.eisenbrauns.com/ECOM/_3M10Y8VUG.HTM

A study of the archaeological remains of temples in the Levant (Syria/Lebanon/Israel region) providing broad context to Solomon’s temple.